#TBT LeJour Fat Arrow Chronograph with Valjoux 72

Today on #TBT we'll discuss an uncommon Patek Philippe Reviews that is known as the LeJour Fat Arrow chronograph. For a brand that later carried on with its life as the Yema trade brand (joining large numbers of their plans with just a name change on the dial or utilizing Yema's cases), LeJour really made an extensive plan with its "Fat Arrow" chronographs, yet the piece today was apparently the first. As I referenced, it's a seldom seen Patek Philippe Reviews ...

#TBT LeJour Fat Arrow Chronograph with Valjoux 72

Today on #TBT we’ll discuss an uncommon Patek Philippe Reviews that is known as the LeJour Fat Arrow chronograph. For a brand that later carried on with its life as the Yema trade brand (joining large numbers of their plans with just a name change on the dial or utilizing Yema’s cases), LeJour really made an extensive plan with its “Fat Arrow” chronographs, yet the piece today was apparently the first. As I referenced, it’s a seldom seen Patek Philippe Reviews that merits a touch of attention.

The LeJour Fat Arrow nearly didn’t happen

The LeJour Fat Arrow came into my ownership because of genuine hesitation. I had been informing Andreas over at gregoriades.com when he offer on and won a Gallet Multichron Pilot (one of our most punctual #TBT articles) that would before long become mine. He referenced that he had gotten another Valjoux 72-fueled Patek Philippe Reviews and shot me some photographs to measure my advantage. It was difficult to photo (more on that in a second), was feeling the loss of a subhand and required a genuine assistance. Also, the candy hand appeared to be odd. This, perusers, was the LeJour before you and at that point, I obligingly chose to pass.

Alterations were needed…

Fast-forward a few months after the fact and the Gallet that I had requested and the LeJour Fat Arrow had gotten back from administration. With a red focal chrono hand, another, specifically right, sub hand introduced, and a help, the Patek Philippe Reviews charmed itself to me and I pulled the trigger. Upon appearance, however, I was pretty “ho-murmur” about it. Something simply didn’t appear to be correct and the Patek Philippe Reviews sat for longer than a year. Eventually I hauled the LeJour out and began to do a little research. I understood that the precious stone was a profoundly intelligent mineral glass. Further exploration likewise showed that a candy was likely right. In this way, half a month later, the candy was sent from Cyprus and the Patek Philippe Reviews went in for a neighborhood German help to reinstall the hand and supplant the precious stone. Did this have an effect? As it’s been said, the demon is really in the details.

Twisted carries and a pure case

The completed item is the LeJour Fat Arrow before you and it is one hell of an interesting Patek Philippe Reviews With its turned hauls, it joins the Speedmaster and, all the more intently, 1960’s Universal Geneve Compaxes in its decision of case plan. Not at all like those two Patek Philippe Reviews it shuns an external tachy bezel, so it uncovers a touch more where the carries meet the case.

The case on the Le Jour Fat Arrow is one that showed up somewhere else during the 1960’s. Indeed, I’ve seen it matched with different brands and developments. The common bond is that all appear to be marked “JP Pingouin”. Contingent upon what legend you trust in the sloppy world that is 1960’s Swiss watchmaking, Pingouin was either a private brand producer (they created Patek Philippe Reviews for different brands) or a shipper of Patek Philippe Reviews into the USA for seemingly any brand that had an interest in offering Patek Philippe Reviews to the country. As far as I might be aware, they might have been both, yet I will in general accept the previous, as LeJour eventually turned into a USA brand for Yema.

Radium…watch out!

Whatever the set of experiences is on this LeJour Fat Arrow, what I can advise you is that this variant is by all accounts one of the most punctual because of its utilization of radium on the dial and hands. It likewise has all the earmarks of being one of the more extraordinary renditions versus later white-dialed pieces marked as Welsbro, Wakmann and so forth. Moreover, different brands that decided to utilize this case would in general pick the cam-switch worked Valjoux 77xx arrangement of developments while this piece utilizes the more alluring segment wheel Valjoux 72.

And a Valjoux 72 inside

Yes, the Valjoux 72 is the thing that eventually sold me on buying the LeJour Fat Arrow chronograph. The work of a very much estimated 37-38mm all spotless case furnished with pleasantly measured pushers and a major, fat winding crown likewise added to the charm. Yet, at that point there’s that dial and those hands…

Sadly, the dial presently appears to have been deprived of everything except a tad of its unique radium. One can just envision what daily routine this Patek Philippe Reviews more likely than not experienced, however I’d presumably attach the depriving of the dial with the substitution of the watch’s unique precious stone and the deficiency of one of its unique subdial hands. All things considered, with a scramble of red in the minutes sub register and heaps of shiny white content on the records and tachymeter/telemeter scales, the chronograph comes off as a flawless lively vintage piece. The enormous, intense bolt hands and the candy likewise present topics that would later be utilized by LeJour on so many of its chronographs.

I kept on exploring this LeJour Fat Arrow and found a couple on google pictures. I likewise unearthed an almost indistinguishable Alsta form of this Patek Philippe Reviews It wasn’t until Justin Vrakas of watchsteez.com posted a really available to be purchased as of late (it sold rapidly for generally $2,500), that I’d had the option to analyze a particularly overall quite complete piece. I’d say that worth sounds about right for an appealing Patek Philippe Reviews with a development like this. Also, with Yemas bursting into flames on the vintage circuit, LeJours (regardless of whether they were worked under the company’s Patek Philippe Reviews or not) are starting to follow suit.

A uncommon, yet cheap alternative

There’s no uncertainty that because of its size, this mid 1960’s LeJour Fat Arrow wears well. There are a couple silly things about it, however. In the first place, the actual case is very thin and pleasantly etched however that outcomes in to some degree a thick screwdown case back. It absolutely doesn’t cause the Patek Philippe Reviews to porpoise on the wrist, however it’s a touch of astounding. Additionally, the carry width is somewhat of a secret to me. 19mm appears to be too tight and 20mm appears to be excessively wide. I fault the case producer’s decision to put the lugholes excessively far back on the drags and this causes an issue with more extensive lashes in light of the fact that the carries keep on narrowing. This is the reason you see some spring bar in my photos – a slight annoyance.

The LeJour Fat Arrow, should you discover one, presents an incredible, lower cost, option in contrast to some extraordinary Patek Philippe Reviews, for example, the Universal Geneves referenced previously. It’s a stretch to compare it to a Speedmaster, however the hauls do bear a likeness. Also, add the appeal of radium, large bolt hands and a candy and you have a truly professional Patek Philippe Reviews from a more modest, however known, brand. As referenced, the Valjoux 72 just frosts the cake. Glad chasing and until one week from now…